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HomeEntertainmentScience/FictionHot water freezes faster than cold water - Here's why?

Hot water freezes faster than cold water – Here’s why?

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Ice_cubes_openphotoHot water seems to freeze faster than cold water, known as the Mpemba effect. The effect was named after the Tanzanian student who in 1963 noticed that hot ice cream mix freezes faster than a cold one.  The effect was first observed by Aristotle in the 4th century BC, then later Francis Bacon and René Descartes. Mpemba published a paper on his findings in 1969.

Theories for the Mpemba effect have included: faster evaporation of hot water, therefore reducing the volume left to freeze; formation of a frost layer on cold water, insulating it; and different concentrations of solutes such as carbon dioxide, which is driven off when the water is heated. Unfortunately the effect doesn’t always appear, and cold water often freezes faster than hot water. Until now, no one had ever worked out exactly why hot water freezes more quickly than cold.

Now a team of physicists from the Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, led by Xi Zhang, have found evidence that it is the chemical bonds that hold water together that provide the effect. Each water molecule is composed of one oxygen atom bonded covalently to two hydrogen molecules. These bonds involve atoms sharing electrons and are well understood. The separate water molecules are also bound together by weaker forces generated by hydrogen bonds. These forces occur when a hydrogen atom from one molecule of water sits close to an oxygen atom from another.

The team now suggest it is these bonds that cause the Mpemba effect. They propose that when the water molecules are brought into close contact, a natural repulsion between the molecules causes the covalent bonds to stretch and store energy. When the liquid warms up, the hydrogen bonds stretch as the water gets less dense and the molecules move further apart.

The stretching in the hydrogen bonds allows the covalent bonds to relax and shrink somewhat, which causes them to give up their energy. The process of covalent bonds giving up their energy is essentially the same as cooling, and so warm water should in theory cool faster than cold. The team’s calculations suggest that the magnitude of the covalent bond relaxation accounts for the experimental differences in the time it takes for hot and cold water to freeze.

 

– Credit for the article goes to: I Fucking Love Science

– See more at :  http://www.iflscience.com/chemistry/hot-water-freezes-faster-cold-and-now-we-know-why#sthash.tk1aM5QU.dpuf

Himanshu Aryahttp://edtimes.in
An Economics Honors student in Delhi University. A metalhead since the age of 11. Loves Tool, Opeth, Iron Maiden, Kiss, Primus, The Porcupine Tree, The Pixies, Pink Floyd, Lamb Of God, Mastodon, Machine Head, Pantera, Buckethead, The Black Dahlia Murder, Arctic Monkeys, Alice in Chains, Gojira, Rage Against The Machine and The Prodigy. A movie buff and a big fan of Quentin Tarantino, Stanley Kubrick, Steven Spielberg, Guillermo Del Toro, Tim Burton and David Fincher. Loves Cryptozoology, Photography, Conspiracy Theories, Economics, History, Sociology and Psychology. What else?....Loves to read books on a wide variety of topics and will surely, sooner or later offend you ;p

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