Home Lifestyle The Chilling Secret Of The Balaji Temple In Rajasthan- A True Story

The Chilling Secret Of The Balaji Temple In Rajasthan- A True Story

Balaji Temple Rajasthan

Indian temples are many and each has its own unique story and things about it that make it special. Of course, there are the mainstream and very popular temples spread across the states, but beyond that, there are also the very bizarre, weird and even downright scary temples that are littered across the country.

There are temples for rats, for dogs, for various special requests like literally one to get Visa and more such things. But amongst all this, a temple in Rajasthan is perhaps the scariest and most disturbing of them.

Mehandipur Balaji temple

Apparently, it is at this temple that evil spirits are exorcised and people come here to get cured of those types of illnesses. The Mehandipur Balaji temple is located in the Mehandipur town and is situated somewhere between the Karauli district and Dausa district in Rajasthan.

The temple gets its name from the town its located in and one of its main deities being the Hindu god Hanuman who is also called ‘Balaji’. Besides Lord Hanuman, the other deities worshipped at the temple are Pret Raj (The King of spirits) and Bhairav.

As per reports, it is said that a priest had a dream where Sri Balaji Maharaj gave indication about a temple with the three deities in that area. There are people who say that within the temple devotees are often immune from normal harms, like pouring hot water on one’s head and still not getting burned.

Apart from this people with blind faith in the powers of the temple and the priest there are also subjected to getting stones pelted at them, getting chained up like animals and also inhaling fumes of the sweet patasas all in order to exorcise themselves from evil spirits.


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According to reports in 2013, there was even a team consisting of scientists, scholars and psychiatrists from Germany, the Netherlands, AIIMS, New Delhi, and the University of Delhi that tried to dig into the temple and understand what the treatments and rituals of the temple were all about.

First laddoos have to be offered to each of the three deities and the rest to be then thrown away that are then collected by temple staff. Only 1 or 2 laddoos are kept by the person that have to be consumed by then.

Devotees absolutely cannot look back once they are done performing their prayers and simply walk out of the temple without looking back. The reason for this is to not tempt any evil spirits that might be lingering around and looking back would mean they could follow the devotee out of the temple premises.

The devotees once done with their prayers are to instantly leave the town as soon as possible and are also prohibited from eating anywhere near it.

It is truly interesting to see the lengths that people will go if they have blind devotion and determination to cure whatever ailment they have.


Image Credits: Google Images

Feature Image designed by Saudamini Seth

Sources: Wikipedia, The Diplomat, India TV News

Find the blogger: @chirali_08

This post is tagged under: Balaji temple Rajasthan, Mehandipur Balaji temple, temple, temple india, scary temple india, Rajasthan, Rajasthan temple, exorcism rituals, Balaji temple 

Disclaimer: We do not hold any right, copyright over any of the images used, these have been taken from Google. In case of credits or removal, the owner may kindly mail us.


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