HRD minister: how qualified are you?

Smriti Irani

Our country loves controversies. Especially if it’s a political hungama. First it was BJP vs Congress, then it was Modi’s marital status and now its Smriti Irani’s (the new HRD minister) educational qualifications. SERIOUSLY? How low can we stoop just to fill ourselves with entertainment?

 

She’s a woman, she’s young. Just give her a chance. Why do we have the mentality of jumping to conclusions without enough proof? You gave Modi  the chance to be the Prime Minister; give him the chance to justify his moves. Cross-questioning before actualisation is just very downtrodden. Modi gave her a job and Congress (as the opposition party) took a cheap shot by questioning the EDUCATIONAL QUALIFICATIONS of the chosen candidate. Well, what can be said? The game of politics makes a folly of many.

Jammu and Kashmir chief minister Omar Abdullah criticised Mr Maken’s comment (who questioned her qualifications).”To say that someone needs to be educated to be HRD Min is like saying one needs to be a pilot for Civil Aviation or a miner for Coal Min (sic),” Mr Abdullah tweeted.

 

Who decides what makes you ‘qualified’ enough? And what are the QUALIFICATIONS REQUIRED TO JUDGE SOMEONE’S QUALIFICATIONS? And being educated doesn’t mean holding a degree; it means to be aware of your surroundings and environment. Being educated means the act of being able to impart knowledge. And surely, knowledge is not text-book bound. It’s utter nonsense. Bill Gates, Albert Einstein were college drop-outs. If they were made education ministers’ would you still question their qualifications?

 

And the BIGGEST QUESTION. Do academic qualifications, alone, serve as your capability of being the HRD minister? Does a degree serve as proof of being ‘adequately qualified’? If yes, then surely the topper of every examination should be made the HRD minister. Why? Because, hello, he’s qualified. Or maybe seeing how much we love to dwell into mindless mayhem, we might say that this specific person is ‘overly qualified’ to hold the ministry.

 

Kapil Sibal, a former HRD minister, is an alumnus of Harvard Law School. What did he majorly give to our education system? Continuous Comprehensive Evaluation a.k.a. CCE. The major setback to students. It’s made the students redundant. Gone are the days when studies were taken seriously. The formatting years of class: X and IX carry no meaning anymore. And sadly, we live in a country where studies matter a lot, where, in order to be a HRD minister, you must hold a degree. Then how has Mr. Sibal helped us? He has taken us away from our goal of ‘education’ and drifted us on the path of extra-curriculars.

 

So the conclusion is very simple. Your success rate as a HRD minister doesn’t depend on how educated you are, it depends on how many people you end up educating.

 

 

 

 

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